Nothing to Say: A Suite of Breathless Motion, Dedicated to Oscar Wilde

by PETER BRÖTZMANN

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    This 75-minute monster is one of Peter Brötzmann's most acclaimed and wide-ranging solo recordings. Featuring a wide variety of instruments, musical approaches, textures, and tonalities. Fire-breathing gospelized fury next to delicate melodies and blues excursions. A Wilde one, for sure.

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All compositions by Peter Brötzmann

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released March 19, 1996

REVIEWS

"'Nothing To Say' is nothing short of the quintessential solo collection from the greatest avant player this planet has yet to offer."
- Opprobrium

"First and foremost, Nothing To Say its about presence and personality – the presence of tone, and the powerful personality of this improviser. It’s said that Brötzmann’s aesthetic is hewn from ‘ugly’, brutish sounds; not so. In fact, he’s also a fine melodic, reflective player. Check out ‘A Heavy Creeping Shade’ where mulish braying is subtly interspersed by a lovely, gently-blown lyrical theme on bass sax; and the suspenseful use of silence and shakuhachi-like overtones of the tarogato on ‘The Sky is Laced With Fitful Red’. Even the scorching tone of ‘A Lying Tale’ is infused with an Ayleresque melodic intensity. Poetry in breathless motion. Terrific."
- Rubberneck

"Through 12 slyly interwoven pieces, Europe’s most visceral multi-instrumentalist varies atmosphere and tonality with an arsenal of horns ranging from bass sax to tarogato. The music is intense throughout. The veteran improviser develops an uncanny emotional center, based around a simple three note vamp teased and twisted, beat down and resuscitated with barrel-chested roars and bestial snarls, chitters, and grunts. His phenomenal command of extended technique and thematic control steers the music into a worldwide web of expression – from whispers to warbles to quasi-R&B soul power. Brötzmann presents an engaging (and, at times, startlingly melodic) breathless motion that pushes ever forward."
- Jazziz

"Peter Brötzmann has a reputation as an aggressive, extroverted player. His bass saxophone performance of the title tune is a characteristic example of his approach: he opens with bursts of staccato heft alternating with longer, legato phrases. “A Lying Tale”, on alto saxophone, with its blasting, always-bent tones, diatonic lines, and sense of drama, makes clear Brötzmann’s Albert Ayler roots. But Brötzmann is also capable of delicacy. On “One That Stood Alone”, he asks questions in the tarogato’s piccolo range, in gurgling lines of generally equal length. On the openings of “There is No Peace” and “Sky”, he shows tenderness, and a sense of spirituals and blues. “Love Makes People Good” is a compendium of Brötzmann techniques: the piece includes bent clarion calls, the where-will-we-end-up phrases, the bird-like twitters, all of which are part of his breath-and-spit, extroverted approach. I offer no opinion on whether he has carried off his programmatic intent – the disc is subtitled “A Suite of Breathless Motion Dedicated to Oscar Wilde” – but I find the listening to be enjoyable."
- Cadence

"It’s a monster at over 75 minutes and, as one would expect, drips with emotion. Even at its quietest moments, and there are plenty of those – one tarogato piece contains an extensive passage of breath sounds on the reed – it’s as though Brötzmann is trying to wrench every last shred of feeling from the bowels of whichever horn is his hands. There is something almost painfully honest about this music with its lack of verily flashy technique and its direct, simple melodies, yet the improvisations constantly take unexpected turns, and there is the perpetual threat of some uncontrollable beast being unleashed at any moment. The humanity and lack of bullshit is what makes Brötzmann as vital and potent a force as ever." - Resonance

Peter Brötzmann: alto, tenor & bass saxophone, tarogato, clarinet, bass clarinet

Recorded by Holger Scheuermann and Jost Gebers on November 15th & 16th, 1994, in Berlin.
Mixed and mastered by Jonas Bergler.
Produced by Peter Brötzmann and Jost Gebers

Booklet artwork/design/layout: Peter Brötzmann.
Photos: Dagmar & Jost Gebers.

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